How tax diversification can fuel your savings goals

Tax season is an opportune time for you and your financial advisor to review the tax treatment of your retirement assets. Strategically distributing your assets among three tax categories can help you keep more money in your pocket. 

This category includes:

  • 401(k)3,11, 403(b)and 457(b) defined contribution plans
  • Traditional IRAs3,6,10
  • Pension plans3
  • Deferred annuities3

The majority of U.S. retirement assets are held in tax-deferred employer plans, which offer the benefits of pre-tax contributions (lowering your annual taxable income) and tax-free growth to accumulate more savings for retirement.

Beginning at age 59 1/2, your withdrawals are taxed as ordinary income, but you won’t pay the 10% early withdrawal penalty.

While it’s wise to take advantage of available employer contributions and annual tax savings, funding your future exclusively with tax-deferred investments can result in a heavier tax burden in retirement.

This category includes:

  • Roth IRAs1,3
  • Municipal bonds/funds2
  • 529 savings plans8
  • Cash-value life insurance policies1,9

Consider some tax-free investments, especially if you expect to be in a higher tax bracket in retirement. You generally won’t pay taxes on withdrawals if certain requirements are met.

Because these investment vehicles aren’t subject to annual required minimum distributions, you can accumulate tax-free earnings for as long as you like.

This category includes:

  • Bank accounts5
  • Brokerage accounts
  • After-tax mutual funds

Taxable assets help support your cash management strategy. Accumulating one to three years of living expenses in liquid assets can help you ride out volatility in a down market without selling other investments at a loss.

While the earnings and sale of taxable assets are subject to current taxes, you may be able to receive preferential tax treatment on long-term capital gains and qualified dividends.

We can help

Meet with your tax and financial advisors to implement a tax-diversification strategy. Doing so could provide you with greater financial flexibility and control today and increase your income in retirement.

Disclosures

Necessary requirements must be met. Consult with your tax advisor.
2 Certain tax-exempt income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax, or state or local taxes. Taxable capital gains or losses may be incurred.
Withdrawal before age 59½ may result in a 10% IRS penalty on taxable earnings.
4 Dividends and long-term capital gains may be taxed at a lower rate. Interest may be taxable even if not received, for example, if from a CD or OID. For certain short-term debt instruments, interest is taxed at maturity.
5 Bank deposits are FDIC insured up to $250,000 per depositor.
6 Funded with after-tax dollars.
7 May elect to tax increase in value currently.
8 When used for qualified higher education expenses; otherwise, you may have to pay income tax plus a 10% penalty to the extent of earnings.
9 Death proceeds generally are not subject to income tax. Loans from a non-Modified Endowment Contract (MEC) policy are not subject to income tax unless the contract lapses or is surrendered. Loans from an MEC policy are subject to income tax to the extent that there is gain in the policy. Partial or full surrenders from a life insurance contract may be subject to income tax to the extent of earnings.
10 Assumes that contributions to the IRA are deductible.
11 Special rules apply to appreciated employer securities in qualified retirement plans.
Ameriprise Financial, Inc. and its affiliates do not offer tax or legal advice. Consumers should consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding their specific situation.
Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC

Rethinking your 401(k)

For most Americans, an employer-based 401(k) is the primary vehicle used for retirement savings. While the pervasive wisdom is to put your savings on autopilot, doing so indefinitely could mean missing valuable opportunities to boost your retirement income. Check out these 5 retirement investment tips to help you maximize your 401(k).

1. Increase your retirement savings

Even if you choose to max out your pre-tax 401(k) contributions for the year, you could boost your savings by making after-tax contributions to your 401(k). While after-tax contributions do not decrease your taxable income, the investment earnings generated inside the 401(k) do compound on a tax-deferred basis.

2. Scrutinize your retirement investment options

Spend time understanding not only your 401(k) investment options, but how you want to allocate those funds. While some people prefer to use an age-appropriate mix of stocks and bonds in their retirement account, that may not be appropriate for others.

Some employer 401(k) plans also allow investing through a brokerage window, with more investment choices like individual stocks or exchange-traded funds. This may be a good option if you’re not satisfied with the fund choices based on your individual situation.

With all investment options, take a close look at the fees, as they can significantly affect investment growth over time.

3. Strategize future taxes

Those who earn too much to open a Roth IRA and anticipate an even higher income in retirement may want to consider a Roth 401(k) option to lower your future tax burden. As with a Roth IRA, you’ll be investing post-tax money, and you won’t be taxed when you withdraw funds at retirement as long as the withdrawal is a qualified distribution.

Be sure to consult with a tax accountant as well as your financial advisor for a holistic approach to your tax strategy.

4. Contribute side earnings

If you’re covered by an employer’s retirement plan and earn income on the side through your own venture, you can put additional tax-advantaged retirement money aside through an Individual 401(k). Your total “employee” contribution must be coordinated with the amount you put into your company plan, but you can still contribute 20-25% of pre-tax business earnings as the “employer’s” portion to your Individual 401(k) account.

5. Diversify your holdings

Sophisticated investment strategies can help you reduce taxes and enhance your returns. One example to consider, if your employer plan allows, is rolling your 401(k) into an IRA before your retirement.

Possible advantages of doing so can include greater diversification, different beneficiary options, more secure access to your account and different distribution options. There can also be potential adverse considerations such as loss of certain credit protections, possible freeze in employer matches and higher fees. Make sure you speak with both your financial and tax advisor before choosing a course of action.

Not sure which options are right for you? A financial advisor can help you understand the pros and cons and take your whole financial picture into consideration.

Disclosures

Do not use this information as the sole basis for investment decisions; it is not intended as advice designed to meet the particular needs of an individual investor.
Be sure you understand the potential benefits and risks of an IRA rollover before implementing. As with any decision that has tax implications, you should consult with your tax adviser prior to implementing an IRA rollover.
Diversification does not assure a profit or protect against loss.
Ameriprise Financial, Inc. and its affiliates do not offer tax or legal advice. Consumers should consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding their specific situation.
Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC.

Rethinking your 401(k)

For most Americans, an employer-based 401(k) is the primary vehicle used for retirement savings. While the pervasive wisdom is to put your savings on autopilot, doing so indefinitely could mean missing valuable opportunities to boost your retirement income. Check out these 5 retirement investment tips to help you maximize your 401(k).

1. Increase your retirement savings

Even if you choose to max out your pre-tax 401(k) contributions for the year, you could boost your savings by making after-tax contributions to your 401(k). While after-tax contributions do not decrease your taxable income, the investment earnings generated inside the 401(k) do compound on a tax-deferred basis.

2. Scrutinize your retirement investment options

Spend time understanding not only your 401(k) investment options, but how you want to allocate those funds. While some people prefer to use an age-appropriate mix of stocks and bonds in their retirement account, that may not be appropriate for others.

Some employer 401(k) plans also allow investing through a brokerage window, with more investment choices like individual stocks or exchange-traded funds. This may be a good option if you’re not satisfied with the fund choices based on your individual situation.

With all investment options, take a close look at the fees, as they can significantly affect investment growth over time.

3. Strategize future taxes

Those who earn too much to open a Roth IRA and anticipate an even higher income in retirement may want to consider a Roth 401(k) option to lower your future tax burden. As with a Roth IRA, you’ll be investing post-tax money, and you won’t be taxed when you withdraw funds at retirement as long as the withdrawal is a qualified distribution.

Be sure to consult with a tax accountant as well as your financial advisor for a holistic approach to your tax strategy.

4. Contribute side earnings

If you’re covered by an employer’s retirement plan and earn income on the side through your own venture, you can put additional tax-advantaged retirement money aside through an Individual 401(k). Your total “employee” contribution must be coordinated with the amount you put into your company plan, but you can still contribute 20-25% of pre-tax business earnings as the “employer’s” portion to your Individual 401(k) account.

5. Diversify your holdings

Sophisticated investment strategies can help you reduce taxes and enhance your returns. One example to consider, if your employer plan allows, is rolling your 401(k) into an IRA before your retirement.

Possible advantages of doing so can include greater diversification, different beneficiary options, more secure access to your account and different distribution options. There can also be potential adverse considerations such as loss of certain credit protections, possible freeze in employer matches and higher fees. Make sure you speak with both your financial and tax advisor before choosing a course of action.

Not sure which options are right for you? A financial advisor can help you understand the pros and cons and take your whole financial picture into consideration.

Disclosures

Do not use this information as the sole basis for investment decisions; it is not intended as advice designed to meet the particular needs of an individual investor.
Be sure you understand the potential benefits and risks of an IRA rollover before implementing. As with any decision that has tax implications, you should consult with your tax adviser prior to implementing an IRA rollover.
Diversification does not assure a profit or protect against loss.
Ameriprise Financial, Inc. and its affiliates do not offer tax or legal advice. Consumers should consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding their specific situation.
Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC.

Rolling over 401k while still employed

Most people only think about rolling over their 401(k) savings into an IRA when they change jobs. For many people, that is an ideal time to shift funds because they can consolidate several retirement accounts from previous employers in one place and take advantage of more investment options. Though there could be reasons not to do so as well.

When leaving an employer, there are typically four 401(k) options:

  1. Leave the money in your former employer’s plan, if permitted
  2. Roll over the assets to the new employer’s plan if one exists and rollovers are permitted
  3. Roll over to an IRA
  4. Cash out the account value

But, leaving an employer isn’t the only time you can move your 401(k) savings. Sometimes it makes sense to roll over your 401(k) assets while you continue to work and make further contributions to your company plan. These rollovers may help you more effectively manage your retirement savings and diversify your investments. It is important to really weigh the pros and cons when considering this. But first, do some checking to see if you’re eligible. Not every 401(k) plan allows you to roll over your 401(k) while you are still working.

Reasons you may want to roll over now

  • Diversification. Investment options in your 401(k) can be limited and are selected by the plan sponsor. Rolling your funds over into an IRA can often broaden your choice of investments. More choices can mean more diversification in your retirement portfolio and the opportunity to invest in a wider range of asset classes including individual stocks and bonds, managed accounts, REITs and annuities.
  • Beneficiary flexibility. With some IRAs, you may be able to name multiple and contingent beneficiaries or name a trust as the beneficiary. Other IRAs may allow you to impose restrictions on beneficiaries. These options aren’t usually available with 401(k)s. But, keep in mind, not all IRA custodians have the same rules about beneficiaries so be sure to check carefully.
  • Ownership control. You are the owner and have access rights with an IRA. The assets in your IRA are also not subject to blackout periods. With a 401(k) plan, the qualified plan trustee owns the assets and assets may be subject to blackout periods in which account access is limited.
  • Distribution options. If your IRA is set up as a Roth IRA, there is not a set age when the owner is required to take minimum distributions. With 401(k) plans and traditional IRAs, the owner will have to take required minimum distributions by April 1 of the year after they turn age 70 ½.

Reasons you may want to wait

  • Temporary ban on contributions. Some plan sponsors impose a temporary ban on further 401(k) contributions for employees who withdraw funds before leaving the company. You’ll want to determine if the gap in contributions will significantly impact your retirement savings.
  • Early retirement. Most 401(k)s allow penalty-free withdrawals after age 55 for early retirees. With an IRA, you must wait until 59 ½ to avoid paying a 10% penalty.
  • Increased fees. IRA investors may pay more fees than they would in employer-sponsored plans. One reason: The range of more sophisticated investment options you may choose can be more expensive than 401(k) investments. Your advisor can help identify what extra cost a rollover may incur and if the benefits of the rollover justify those additional costs.
  • Can take loans out. Your 401(k) may permit you to take out a loan from the account, but this is typically only for active employees. And you may have to pay in full any outstanding loan balances when you leave the company. You cannot take loans from IRAs.

Next steps

Your advisor can help you determine if an early 401(k) rollover fits in with your retirement savings plan. They can also help determine what investments are best for you if you do decide to roll over your funds.

Disclosures

Investment products are not federally or FDIC-insured, are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed by any financial institution, and involve investment risks including possible loss of principal and fluctuation in value
Be sure you understand the potential benefits and risks of an IRA rollover before implementing. As with any decision that has tax implications, you should consult with your tax adviser prior to implementing an IRA rollover.  
Diversification can help protect against certain investment risks, but does not assure a profit or protect against loss.
Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC.

Rolling over 401k while still employed

Most people only think about rolling over their 401(k) savings into an IRA when they change jobs. For many people, that is an ideal time to shift funds because they can consolidate several retirement accounts from previous employers in one place and take advantage of more investment options. Though there could be reasons not to do so as well.

When leaving an employer, there are typically four 401(k) options:

  1. Leave the money in your former employer’s plan, if permitted
  2. Roll over the assets to the new employer’s plan if one exists and rollovers are permitted
  3. Roll over to an IRA
  4. Cash out the account value

But, leaving an employer isn’t the only time you can move your 401(k) savings. Sometimes it makes sense to roll over your 401(k) assets while you continue to work and make further contributions to your company plan. These rollovers may help you more effectively manage your retirement savings and diversify your investments. It is important to really weigh the pros and cons when considering this. But first, do some checking to see if you’re eligible. Not every 401(k) plan allows you to roll over your 401(k) while you are still working.

Reasons you may want to roll over now

  • Diversification. Investment options in your 401(k) can be limited and are selected by the plan sponsor. Rolling your funds over into an IRA can often broaden your choice of investments. More choices can mean more diversification in your retirement portfolio and the opportunity to invest in a wider range of asset classes including individual stocks and bonds, managed accounts, REITs and annuities.
  • Beneficiary flexibility. With some IRAs, you may be able to name multiple and contingent beneficiaries or name a trust as the beneficiary. Other IRAs may allow you to impose restrictions on beneficiaries. These options aren’t usually available with 401(k)s. But, keep in mind, not all IRA custodians have the same rules about beneficiaries so be sure to check carefully.
  • Ownership control. You are the owner and have access rights with an IRA. The assets in your IRA are also not subject to blackout periods. With a 401(k) plan, the qualified plan trustee owns the assets and assets may be subject to blackout periods in which account access is limited.
  • Distribution options. If your IRA is set up as a Roth IRA, there is not a set age when the owner is required to take minimum distributions. With 401(k) plans and traditional IRAs, the owner will have to take required minimum distributions by April 1 of the year after they turn age 70 ½.

Reasons you may want to wait

  • Temporary ban on contributions. Some plan sponsors impose a temporary ban on further 401(k) contributions for employees who withdraw funds before leaving the company. You’ll want to determine if the gap in contributions will significantly impact your retirement savings.
  • Early retirement. Most 401(k)s allow penalty-free withdrawals after age 55 for early retirees. With an IRA, you must wait until 59 ½ to avoid paying a 10% penalty.
  • Increased fees. IRA investors may pay more fees than they would in employer-sponsored plans. One reason: The range of more sophisticated investment options you may choose can be more expensive than 401(k) investments. Your advisor can help identify what extra cost a rollover may incur and if the benefits of the rollover justify those additional costs.
  • Can take loans out. Your 401(k) may permit you to take out a loan from the account, but this is typically only for active employees. And you may have to pay in full any outstanding loan balances when you leave the company. You cannot take loans from IRAs.

Next steps

Your advisor can help you determine if an early 401(k) rollover fits in with your retirement savings plan. They can also help determine what investments are best for you if you do decide to roll over your funds.

Disclosures

Investment products are not federally or FDIC-insured, are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed by any financial institution, and involve investment risks including possible loss of principal and fluctuation in value
Be sure you understand the potential benefits and risks of an IRA rollover before implementing. As with any decision that has tax implications, you should consult with your tax adviser prior to implementing an IRA rollover.  
Diversification can help protect against certain investment risks, but does not assure a profit or protect against loss.
Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC.